Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Wednesday Search Challenge (8/8/12): Who said that?



Here’s a kind of search problem that people have fairly often.  

You hear one thing and try to understand what’s going on, despite not being completely sure of what you heard.  Here's example (and a true story)…

I was in a jazz club last night, when the band leader said the most curious thing, he said (roughly transcribed), 

     “...we’re going to play santimanite then go lime on the beach to extempo…” 

What an extraordinary sentence.  

And I’m pretty sure I got the words reasonably accurately, but I have no idea what’s going on! 

Question for today:  

       Who is the trumpeter that said this curious phrase?  (And what does it mean??)

(Once you know that, you can probably figure out where I was last night...)  

Tell us HOW you figured this one out and about how long you took. 

Search on!



53 comments:

  1. Was it Etienne Charles?

    A search for "santimanite" took me to the Wikipedia page for Extempo which has a variant spelling of "Santimanitay", one of four Extempo melodies. A search for ("lime on the beach" trinidad) found me a page (http://folk.uio.no/geirthe/Liming.html) that calls Liming "The art of doing nothing"

    Getting back to the trumpeter, searching for (Extempo Trumpeter trinidad) popped up Etienne's page, and looking in his show schedule I can see he was in SF yesterday at Yoshi's.

    Seems like a pretty good fit to me.

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  2. Etienne Charles. You were at Yoshi's in SF.

    I searched on 'Santimanite'. One of the links referred also to an 'Extempo' competition. Going to Charles' Web site, I see that he played in SF last night.

    Took me about 4 minutes total, but I had the basics within about 30 seconds.

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  3. The trumpeter - Etienne Charles
    Etienne Charles at Yoshi's Jazz Club and Japanese Restaurant. Tue 8/7 8:00p.

    First searched for [ santimanite ] to find references to turmpeter Etienne Charles then searched for [ etienne charles ] within the past 24 hours.

    Under the search [santimate] was also a reference to Calypso War on Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calypso_War

    "The classic War form is an eight-line stanza, the first four lines in a minor key, then modulating into the major, and returning to the minor with the refrain "santimanite" ("sans humanité" in patois, in English "without humanity")."

    Searched for [lime on the beach] was a little obscure so searched for [define "lime on the beach"] and got references to "liming" or doing nothing.

    Searching for [extempo] took me to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extempo

    "Extempo (also extempo calypso) is a lyrically improvised form of calypso and is most notably practised in Trinidad and Tobago. It consists of a performer improvising in song or in rhythmic speech on a given theme before an audience who themselves take turns to perform. It is inherently competitive and success is judged by the wit and ingenuity of the performance."

    So they were going to play Santimate then hangout a little and then go into an improvisational battle.

    10 minutes

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  4. Santimanite = Etienne Charles - song [folk jazz]

    go lime = trinidad phrase for Let's go and chill

    to extempo = lyrically improvised form of calypso (Calypso is a style of Afro-Caribbean music that originated in Trinidad and Tobago from African and European roots)

    So, basically, they're going to go chill out on the beach and jam to calypso music.

    I basically searched google for each of the phrases, which were on wikipedia. It took me less than 15 minutes.

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  5. Hello,

    Maybe It's Etienne Charles at the
    Yoshi's Jazz Club, San Francisco

    The phrase is related to basic melody of calypso improvisation
    My english is quite bad, an extra difficulty to figure out what he meant. My calypso knowlegde is worst
    [santimanite] -> the trumpeter
    [Etienne Charles 07/08/2012] -> the location
    [extempo] -> some explanation about calypso

    ReplyDelete
  6. Answer:

    Etienne Charles, who performed at 8 p.m. last night, Tuesday, August 7th, at Yoshi's Jazz Club and Japanese Restaurant at 1330 Fillmore St, San Francisco, CA.

    Methodology:

    I brought up the individual search results for each of the following phrases: [ santimanite ], [ "lime on the beach" ], and [ extempo ].

    The results for "santimanite" seemed the most promising as they included references to one "Etienne Charles".

    The results for [ Etienne Charles ] included a "News for Etienne Charles" section under which there was a link to the following San Jose Mercury News article:

    Trumpeter Etienne Charles comes to the Bay Area
    http://www.mercurynews.com/entertainment/ci_21174398/trumpeter-etienne-charles-comes-bay-area

    The performance venues and times are listed at the bottom of the article.

    Time:

    Less than 5 minutes.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Took about 15 minutes (including distractions at work). First I googled santimanite and found that it's a Calypso/Jazz song that has been played by several different people. Then I googled the phrase "lime on the beach" and found that it's a Trinidad & Tobago term, so I looked for Trinidadian Calypso trumpeters. The 4th result was this article talking about Etienne Charles: http://repeatingislands.com/2012/08/01/trumpeter-etienne-charles-comes-to-the-bay-area/
    Then I went to his site to see that last night, he played at Yoshi's in San Francisco.

    I believe the phrase means that he was going to play the song "Santimanite," then jam for a bit, followed by some freestyling extemporaneously.

    ReplyDelete
  8. A search for "santimanite" revealed a wikipedia article on "Calypso War", indicating that it is the patois term for a traditional tune for a competetive form of musical improvisation, also called "extempo". It also linked heavily to Etienne Charles, a famous jazz trumpeter.

    Searching "lime patois" found a slang-terms blog post describing "to lime" as "to hang around with (old friends) at a particular location" with no particular time limit - an informal, long-term, relaxing get-together.

    Searching "etienne charles august 7 2012" found a link to Yoshi's San Fransisco Jazz Club, so that's probably where you were when Etienne Charles said they were going to finish out the set with a rendition of a traditional calypso war tune, then head down to the beach to hang out and have a sing-off.

    Time elapsed: about four minutes. Surprisingly easy, but fun!

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  9. Etienne Charles is the only trumpeter I could connect with an extempo performance last night (Yoshi's). As near as I can figure it, the phrase details the basic melodies that are going to be used. "Santimanitay" is the initial melody, "extempo" is the style, "lime on the beach" is the mood.

    I first searched the entire phrase, then broke it down into pieces until I arrived at the Wikipedia "extempo" entry, which gave me an alternate spelling for "santimanitay". I searched for trumpeters who play extempo and had performed in the last 24 hours, which turned up Etienne Charles.

    "Lime on the beach" caused the most trouble, but I eventually found an article on "liming" in Trinidad by cross-searching "calypso".

    ~10 minutes

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  10. You were probably at The Blue Lagoon, 923 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz to see Etienne Charles. He performs extempo calypso. What it means, "we're going to play santimanitay (to have no mercy)".

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  11. I believe the trumpeter is Etienne Charles who said the phrase at Yoshis in San Francisco last night.

    The sentence means they're going to play "Santimanite," a tune from the 2009 Folklore album.

    To "go lime on the beach to extempo" means to go hang out on the beach to extempo (which, according to wikipedia "consists of a performer improvising in song or in rhythmic speech on a given theme before an audience who themselves take turns to perform.")

    This took me a bit longer than usual. I think Google sent me in the wrong direction with spelling correction. As I typed in santimanite, Google wanted to correct it to Santimanitay, which then turns out to be an album by Soul Train Soul from 2006 with Lars Vissing on trumpet. I went down that path for awhile before deciding I was on the wrong path and started over avoiding the spelling correction. Took me about 5 minutes from that point...

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  12. Guessing maybe you were listening to Etienne Charles in San Francisco. He has a song named "Santimanite" and the rest of the phrase seems to indicate that they were going to transition to an improvised Calypso beat in a relaxed manner.

    Started off by searching for "jazz trumpeter santimanite" which led to Etienne Charles. In the same search results Wikipedia had the term "santimanite" defined as "sans humanité" in patois, in English "without humanity". Thinking maybe "lime on the beach" was patois also, searching for "lime on the beach patois" indicated that "lime"="relaxed. Extempo is a lyrically improvised form of calypso music.

    Close?

    Total search time - around 11 minutes or so

    ReplyDelete
  13. Sanitmanitay is a melody in the music form Extempo (also known as Calyspo). "Lime on the beach" means to hang around at the beach. I used Google to figure out what "santimanitay" and "extempo" meant. I was directed to a Wikipedia article. That took about two minutes. It took me ten minutes to figure out what "lime on the beach" meant . . . using Google, I got to this article: http://www.skettel.com/liming/ So, the entire expression probably means: we're going to play the santimantay melody as we go to the beach to hang around and calypso.

    I found it difficult to tell if you were describing your experience or someone else's experience. Assuming, it was your experience (you can guess probably guess where I was last night), after extensive searching for various festivals and famous trumpeters, I came up with nada.

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  14. Lesson: break queries into parts, then reassemble relevant info in context.
    Think you were @ Yoshi's in San Francisco listening to Etienne Charles.
    The method for me was to break the question into pieces - looked for the meanings of santimanite, lime on the beach and extempo... once I found extempo was a form of music out of Trinidad & Tobago, looked for trumpet connected to the form, found Etienne Charles - on his web site it showed the club date at Yoshi's. Found Santimanite was a piece of his. Looked up lime on the beach, saw it was associated with the art of idling in T&T culture... so I'm guessing there was a little audience participation session, extempo style after the regular club performance.
    Hope you had your hair queffed and you weren't quaccoowaja.
    LIV WARFIELD plus Jarrod Lawson might be worth catching too.
    Did you really go to the beach and if so, where? Any Chevron fallout?
    E.Charles
    Santimanite

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  15. $14 dollars well spent - unless you worked the sr. discount - kidding Dan ;-)
    forgot to mention time - around 25 minutes - listened to Santimanite and a couple other things - what good is search if you don't enjoy the discoveries along the way? Also ran down a dead end with MARTIN&MARTIN of Rhythm and Steel while looking at extempo... myspace lives on... thanks for putting some music in Wednesday!
    more EC/Yoshi info/conformation
    EC in NYC

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  16. I think it was Etienne Charles playing at Yoshi's in San Francisco, but I can't find anything definitive to prove it.

    I started out searching parts of the quote. I learned that "go lime" means to relax and is slang used in Trinidad. I searched "santimanite" and got hits with Etienne Charles. According to his facebook, he played at Yoshi's on the night in question, plays trumpet, and is from Trinidad. I know that Daniel Russell lives in California and works at Google, so it is reasonable for him to go to Yoshi's.

    As to what the phrase means, the best I can figure, he is saying that they are going to play Santimanitay and casually move into an extempo (which is like calypso, according to wikipedia).

    It took me 5 minutes to find the trumpeter and I spent 10 minutes trying to understand what extempo means.

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  17. Looks like Etienne Charles (Yoshi's in SF - not Oakland anymore?).
    Santimanite is the 9th track on his 2009 release Folklore. The word is patois for "without humanity."
    "lime" is a Trinidadian term for hanging around. So, Lime on the Beach would mean hanging around on the beach. This doesn't appear to be a composed song. I suspect it means improvising.
    Extempo is another Trinidadian term, this one meaning a sort of calypso rap. I couldn't find it as a song, so I suspect it means improvisation, maybe with the added dimension of each musician taking a turn soloing, possibly in a competitive manner (which is how Extempo works lyrically in Trinidad).
    This took me about 6 minutes to figure out.
    1. first google the seemingly most unique word: santimanite jazz. Result: etienne charles
    2. Went to his website and found the song and his schedule for 8/7: Yoshi's SF.
    3. Also saw he is connected with Trinidad
    4. Searched "Trinidad extempo": found wikipedia extempo page, plus the about page on Charles's site.
    5. Searched "lime on the beach" and found a definition with reference to it being a Trinidadian term. Made my assumptions from there.

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  18. If I had to guess, I'd say the trumpeter was Etienne Charles, who's from Trinidad and plays its music, including Santimanite and extempo. I made this guess after Googling this search phrase:

    extempo santimanite lime club trumpet

    and reading a profile of Charles at this website:

    http://www.outlish.com/example-pages-and-menu-links/?res=800-600

    His website was easy to find, of course, and it said that last night he was to perform at Yoshi's, in San Francisco.

    My early searches were to learn what the various words meant. I'd guess it means, "We're going to play [the song from his 2009 album] Santimanite, then go to the beach and do some hanging out and swapping stories the way they do in Trinidad, and do improvised round-robin songs called extempos."

    Took me about 20 minutes.

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  19. Hi Dan,

    It took about 3 minutes:

    I went at it backwards from the "where you were last night" idea -- I searched: jazz trumpet "august 7, 2012" "san francisco" (The San Francisco part was a bit of a guess) and the first hit was "Yoshi's" http://www.goldstar.com/events/san-francisco-ca/yoshis-jazz-club, which said that Trinidadian trumpet player Etienne Charles was there last night.

    A regular search on "santimanite" gave me the (corrected spelling) results for "santimanitay". The third result down was Wikipedia entry about "Extempo": Extempo (also extempo calypso) is a lyrically improvised form of calypso and is most notably practised in Trinidad and Tobago. It consists of a performer improvising in song or in rhythmic speech on a given theme before an audience who themselves take turns to perform. It is inherently competitive and success is judged by the wit and ingenuity of the performance.

    Another result from that search brought me to http://www.whatocook.com/trini_patois_words.html which has some Trinidadian patois words including:"Sans Humanite" (santimanitay) - "without mercy."

    A search on the phrase "lime on the beach" got me to http://www.skettel.com/liming/ "The etymology of the word liming is obscure. It is a Trinidadian word, probably of recent origin since English has been a popular language in Trinidad for less than a century. It means, roughly, "hanging around" - but as we shall see, there is no exact linguistic or cultural equivalent to liming in the cultural contexts with which most of us are familiar." .... "A lime can further be elevated to the category of memorable limes if an unexpected opportunity for enjoyment emerges in the course of liming; if somebody appears in a car and invites everybody to come and lime on the beach at Maracas or Carenage, or if somebody invites the lime to a party or a film, or if somebody knows about available women nearby, or if news arrive that there is a stickfight or a cockfight in the area - or, for that matter (in the case of liming hustlers), if a job offer appears."

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  20. My best guess/search: Yoshi's Jazz Club and Japanese Restaurant, San Francisco, CA
    Etienne Charles
    "go lime on the beach:" hanging out/socialising in an informal relaxing environment, especially with friends, for example at a party, or on the beach.
    I think I must have spent about 25-30 to find this out.

    BTW, I am currently enjoying your course Power searching with Google.

    Thank you so much!

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  21. Hi Dan,

    It took about 3 minutes:

    I went at it backwards from the "where you were last night" idea -- I searched: jazz trumpet "august 7, 2012" "san francisco" (The San Francisco part was a bit of a guess) and the first hit was "Yoshi's" http://www.goldstar.com/events/san-francisco-ca/yoshis-jazz-club, which said that Trinidadian trumpet player Etienne Charles was there last night.

    A regular search on "santimanite" gave me the (corrected spelling) results for "santimanitay". The third result down was Wikipedia entry about "Extempo": Extempo (also extempo calypso) is a lyrically improvised form of calypso and is most notably practised in Trinidad and Tobago. It consists of a performer improvising in song or in rhythmic speech on a given theme before an audience who themselves take turns to perform. It is inherently competitive and success is judged by the wit and ingenuity of the performance.

    Another result from that search brought me to http://www.whatocook.com/trini_patois_words.html which has some Trinidadian patois words including:"Sans Humanite" (santimanitay) - "without mercy."

    A search on the phrase "lime on the beach" got me to http://www.skettel.com/liming/ "The etymology of the word liming is obscure. It is a Trinidadian word, probably of recent origin since English has been a popular language in Trinidad for less than a century. It means, roughly, "hanging around" - but as we shall see, there is no exact linguistic or cultural equivalent to liming in the cultural contexts with which most of us are familiar." .... "A lime can further be elevated to the category of memorable limes if an unexpected opportunity for enjoyment emerges in the course of liming; if somebody appears in a car and invites everybody to come and lime on the beach at Maracas or Carenage, or if somebody invites the lime to a party or a film, or if somebody knows about available women nearby, or if news arrive that there is a stickfight or a cockfight in the area - or, for that matter (in the case of liming hustlers), if a job offer appears."

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  22. First time trying this, so maybe I'm missing something but:

    Etienne Charles, played at the Yoshi's San Fran last night.

    Searched "santimanite", first hit, for name, maybe 5 seconds. Searched his name, got site & tour dates for location, maybe another 10.

    So like, 15 seconds?

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  23. The who and where is very obvious, very fast. The what is much harder. Still not sure I got it.

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  24. ...And the artist's roots give the rest away.

    Total was <2 min.

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  25. Etienne Charles? Not too many places to find live jazz around here, and he seems to like the phrase "come lime"

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  26. Etienne Charles at Yoshi's San Francisco Jazz Restaurant August 7th.

    Santimanite is a song from his Folklore alblum and extempo is off the cuff music.

    Total time about 20 minutes.

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  27. We are going to play "santimanite" (the name of a song from his 2009 album entitled "Folklore") and then relax to extempo… (extempo involves improvisation and has been defined as "lyrically improvised calypso").
    -Spoken by Etienne Charles at Yoshi's in San Francisco on August 7, 2012.

    This search was difficult in that it required learning a bit about Calypso music. I spend about 25 minutes on the search and much of that time was spent bouncing around many different sites. I started by looking for the word "santimanite". Several sites discussed this word and at least one of those sites led me to Etienne Charles. Investigating Etienne Charles, I discovered that he had a song called "Santimanite" and amazon.com showed me which album this song was on. Looking at his personal website I found that he was playing in San Francisco last night – at Yoshi's.

    I then had to explore different possible meanings of the other terms in the sentence "liming on the beach" and "extempo". There were different interpretations but I settled on the one written above. Although I am not really happy with my "translation" of the sentence, I feel that it captures the gist of the meaning.

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  28. Howard Fishman and the Biting FIsh Brass Band.

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  29. Oops. Sorry I jumped without explaining

    I looked up "Liming on the beach" and found a blog about Barbados. Then looked up "Barbados Trumpter Santimanite" and then looked up who Etienne Charles was currently playing with.

    It could be with his own band... But I liked the name of Howard Fishman's band.

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  30. The trumpeter was Etienne Charles and you were at Yoshi's, SF.
    The terms are related to Calypso and Etienne Charles played in San Franscico on Tuesday night.
    I found by searching for Santimanite which lead to Wikipedia and Calypso and so on. I then searched for [Calypso trumpeter] and found immediately Etienne Charles then ["Etienne Charles" dates] and found on his own website he was playing in SF on tuesday evening, et voilà !
    I can't tell the time I spent searching (it was quite easy) for I listened to a lot of calypso music (which I really didn't know) during the search and spent a lot of time on youtube :-) Thanks to internet !

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  31. First I started with "extempo", which led me to the corresponding Wikipedia article explaining that it's an improvised form of calypso.

    Next, I tried "lime on the beach" without much success, but I had a hunch that "to go lime" was a phrase that meant something. I shudder to say that Yahoo! Answers (which showed up on the SERP after querying "go lime") actually bore some truth. It's a phrase from Trinidad meaning to hang out or relax.

    Thanks to Google suggesting that I misspelled my query, "santimanite" should have been spelled "santimanitay". Again, Wikipedia informed me that this is a basic melody common to calypso.

    So basically the band leader either literally (or wants the audience member to imagine him-/herself) perform santimanitay style calypso while relaxing on the beach.

    The most difficult part was determining who said the phrase. I know you work at Google, so I knew I needed to find a jazz club that featured calypso performers in your area -- "jazz club calypso near san francisco". A club named Yoshi's came up, so I looked at their event calendar. I clicked on the artist links for the past week in August and found one on August 7 -- Etienne Charles. The page featuring that event confirmed that he plays the trumpet and performs calypso music.

    Total time was about 20-25 minutes.

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  32. Searched for "band leader speaks in jive" and first result was a review for a stage production of "Club Morocco" where the band leader, Chick Valentine, only speaks in jive.

    Took less than 1 minute of search.
    Took about 5 minutes to reach the conclusion that maybe you saw this show.

    Did you go to a production of this musical?

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    Replies
    1. LOL, wow, I was way off. Nice job everybody (except me).

      Delete
  33. I'm not sure if this is where we post our responses so watch out for spoilers if you're reading this.
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    Took me a while, but I think I've got it.
    This was said by Etienne Charles at Yoshi's Jazz club in San Francisco last night. As far as what it means, I think he was trying to say that he would begin with a particular style of music known as War Calypso, then relax into Extempo, and improvised form of Calypso music in which the audience usually participates. This took me about 40 minutes in total. I started off just by googling the words extempo and santimanite. This yielded two wikipedia articles that provided some background on what was said. The phrase "Lime on the beach" presented more problems, but a quick urbandictionary search revealed it as a slang phrase of Trinidad meaning either "to relax" or "a party." Given that such phrasing rarely shows up outside of Trinidad, I tried to extract the metadata from the photo at the top of the page to see where it was taken, but this yielded no results. I then began searching for music performances, using the keywords sanimanite, trinidad, and extempo. Though I briefly got sidetracked when I found that Carribean music star Orlando Phillips had been playing in kentucky last night, this eventually produced a link to the site for Yoshi's jazz club, where the phrase above was (presumably) said last night.

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  34. I think that you were at Yoshis in San Francisco listening to Etienne Charles. It took me about ten minutes to figure this out. Do I have to tell how?

    -Rye

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  35. Googled "extempo" and "santimanite" separately and figured out we were discussing Calypso jazz music specifically from Trinidad and Tobago. 5th entry on Google for santimanite was a link to an Etienne Charles video. Googled him to confirm that he's from T&T. So there's the trumpter in question. Now for the tougher part, what does all that mean? Well, googling "trinidad lime" gets an Urban Dictionary definition for lime as slang for party or hangout. From the original googles, we know that santimanite and extempo are types of T&T jazz. From that we can guess that Etienne was planning to play some sanitmanite music, then attend a party on the beach and listen to the T&T equivalent of freestyle rap. 15 minutes total. Also, Etienne played a club in San Francisco last night, I'm guessing that's where you were.

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  36. Just kidding about the how. :-) I broke the search up into three pieces since nothing looked familiar. One was santimanite, one was lime on the beach and the third was extempo. I started seeing a pattern right away when they all pointed to Trinidad and Tobago. The only popular jazz trumpeter from Trinidad and Tobago I could find was Etienne and he was playing last night at Yoshis according to his web site. That's the short answer!
    -Rye

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  37. The trumpeter was Etienne Charles, playing at Yoshi's in San Francisco. "Santimanite" is a song title; "extempo" means out of time, so presumably a style of playing off the established time; "lime on the beach" I have no idea about.

    Still, I got that in about 3 minutes (6:24pm to 6:27pm) by searching Bing for "jazz, santimanite" which led me to an Amazon page for that song with his name, then I searched the name and found his website, and yesterday's date (8/7) is listed under "upcoming shows."

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  38. The trumpeter is Etienne Charles, the jazz club is Yoshi's in San Francisco, Santimanite is a song, "go lime" is a typical expression of Trinidad meaning "go and hang out together" (with friends), extempo is a lyrically improvised form of calypso, also typical of Trinidad and Tobago.
    How I figured it out? I just broke the sentence in little pieces and googled each piece:
    1. Santimanite->video on youtube "Etienne Charles - Santimanite"->website of Etienne Charles->calendar of concerts
    2. "go lime"->Yahoo answers "Why do Trinidadians say "Let's go lime."
    3. extempo->wikipedia article

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  39. Yoshi's San Francisco.Etienne Charles

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  40. You work for Google and live in California, so I assumed you were at Yoshi's (SF or Oakland) last night.

    Etienne Charles, the trumpeter and Trinidadian band leader, played at Yoshi's SF yesterday (http://www.yoshis.com/sanfrancisco/jazzclub/artist/show/2867)

    As far as I can tell, “...we’re going to play santimanite then go lime on the beach to extempo…” means that they're going to play a "war song," a boastful calypso song, then go into a relaxed sort of flow for a while, then go into a more competitive improvised extempo.

    I googled Santimanite, which led me to this video of Etienne Charles' band playing a song called Santimanite (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsmGH_WY2FA). A google search for "Santimanite" led me to the Wiki page for Calypso War (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calypso_War), a form of improvised calypso music with a set structure, usually ending in the word "Santimanite," or "without humanity."

    "Extempo," (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extempo) which I found linked in the same Wiki article, is a competitive form of improvised calypso.

    "Lime on the beach" is harder; I couldn't find any calypso songs with that name, but googling ["to lime" slang] found me http://www.limeincharleston.com/, which explains that to lime is "Trinidadian slang for a group of friends hanging out together. It can be large or small, pre-arranged or impromptu. It often involves food, and ALWAYS requires beverages (not necessarily alcoholic, but it certainly may). It is NEVER a hurried activity. It can occur on a beach, by a river, at someone's home, or on a street corner."

    Took about 20 minutes.

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  41. I'm guessing you saw Etienne Charles at Yoshis in SF on Tuesday night.

    Just found this blog via Lifehacker - very cool! It took me a couple minutes of searching - didn't know to time myself.

    I started out by googling extempo, which lead me to a wikipedia page about an improvised form of calypso music, which included references to "Santimanitay," so that seemed to be the first word you were trying to transcribe. I then looked around for more info on what "lime on the beach" might mean - turns out, it's a Trinidadian phrase meaning to "hang out" or "do nothing," as far as I could tell. Searches around Trinidad, trumpet, calypso, and jazz all seemed to come up with one name - Etienne Charles. He played in San Francisco last night, and since you work at Google, which is headquartered in the bay area, it seemed like a good guess!

    Diana

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  42. A Google search for "Santimanite" brings up the trumpeteer and composer of that song, Etienne Charles. His website shows that he was playing a show at Yoshi's in San Francisco on August 7. As for the "lime on the beach" I have no idea what it means.

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  43. was it Etienne Charles, perhaps? Santimanite is a song title of his but also seems to be the name of a melody common to extempo, which, in return, is a type of calypso, which again is a type of music most commonly played in Trinidad/Tobago, where Etienne Charles is from. He did play in Yoshi's jazz club on August 7, 2012. As for 'lime on the beach', apparently it means as much as 'hang out/party on the beach'

    My search routine was a bit messy I guess... first searching for santimanite and santimanitay for which I got several results linking to trinidad tobago, one of those being a chapter about trinidad tobago in 'A Look at The Caribbean and Its People and Culture' which provided the information about extempo and calypso, the meaning of 'to lime' and santimanitay being a melody of extempo, all of which didn't really tell me who the trumpeter was, so I did a new search for jazz bar august 7 2012, also with santimanite, and calypso, respectively, added to the search string. Etienne Charles was always around the top results there... I'm not perfectly sure since I'm sure there might be other jazz musicians from trinidad tobago in other places all over the world who might have played calypso/extempo style songs on that date but it seems plausible enough.

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  44. Search for "santimanite" to a YouTube of Etienne Charles.
    It also had a reference to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calypso_War which had a see also: Extempo which defined that.
    Search for "go lime on the beach" which got Urban Dictionary for Lime "hanging out/socialising in an informal relaxing environment, especially with friends, for example at a party, or on the beach"
    About 10 min.

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  45. Yoshi's Jazz Club and Japanese Restaurant SF Trumpet by Etienne Charles

    I googled "santimanite", went to YouTube found out the name of the most prominent trumpeter associated with "santimanite". Next I googled "etienne charles" and used a date range of the last one week. From this I foundout where he was performing during the period under consideration.

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  46. Oops! I forgot to add the answer the second part of the question:
    Lime on the beach to extempo: hang out casually on the beach/river/wherever and improvise.

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  47. I would just like to know an easier way to find the "advance search" on Google. Most sites have the link to their advance search located right next to the search text box - not Google! I had to use the search to find the advance search page for Google.

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  48. First, I made a query define:santimanite
    and found the YouTube page http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsmGH_WY2FA:
    Etienne Charles - Santimanite - live at dizzy's club coca cola

    To be sure, that Etienne Charles is the same person I was looking for, I made another query:
    "etienne charles" AND jazz AND band leader AND trumpet. So far so good. I checked his Official Website for Shows.

    Then, I made a query: define:go to lime and figured out that "go to lime" belongs to Trinidadian slang that means "get together". Etienne Charles is from Trinidad.

    The last query I made was "Extempo wikipedia".

    Time: 30 min

    Answer: Etienne Charles, "Now we are going to play this melody and then we get together to the beach to continue with lyrical improvisation", Club Blue Whale (LA)

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    Replies
    1. Nicely done, Oksana.

      Note that you don't need to include the AND between each search term. It's not helping you in any way, simpler to leave them out.

      Delete
  49. Etienne Charles / Yoshi's San Francisco Jazz Club.
    Santimanite is a song by this guy (I'm listening to it right now, it's nice)
    Lime on the beach? No idea
    Took me roughly 9 minutes to figure it out.

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  50. Ettiene Charles, at the Blue Whale (Los Angeles, CA). Santimanite is the song, extempo is "a singing competition between two competitors. In classic extempo, competitors were pitted against each other hurling insults in verse about each competitors appearance, singing abilities or personal situations" (according to http://www.enotes.com/topic/Calypsonian). Couldn't get the "Lime on the beach", though.

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