Wednesday, February 12, 2020

SearchResearch Challenge (2/12/20): What is Bernard singing about?


I guess I'm still in a Central European frame of mind... 

A few weeks ago we had a Challenge about the song that goes "eins, zwei, g'suffa."  

In the process of doing my research for that Challenge, I ran across a hauntingly beautiful song on YouTube. 


I found this YouTube video with the song “Ranz des Vaches” as sung by Bernard Romanens. 

Bernard Romanens singing Ranz des Vaches.




Listen to it--a wonderful song that strikes at your heartstrings.  

But the description is in French, and as I listened, I realized that I don't understand either the song OR the context.  

What's going on in this little video? 

As I listened I couldn't help my curiosity about what's happening here.  My brain started asking questions--maybe you can answer them!!  (Doesn't your mind work like this too?)  


In particular... 

1. He’s singing this song at a festival.  What festival was it?  

2. When will that festival be held next?

3. Once upon a time, this song was forbidden from being sung?  (What?  Why?  Where?  When?) 

4. What are the lyrics?   What is the translation into English?  (I can’t understand ANYTHING!) 

5. Bernard Romanens is clearly wearing some kind of traditional costume that suggests a particular kind of job.  What is Romanens job (as indicated by his costume)?  

Next time we'll move beyond Central European tunes, but I had to pose this Challenge because I couldn't get this song out of my head for the past two weeks.  Ever since I heard it, I've been dreaming of singing in a sunny field in Switzerland, alphorns in the distance, gazing happily across the snowy Alps with clouds of edelweiss in the meadow before me.  

Search on!  


Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Fluff filters, and why you want to read with them turned on



You can simply read a page,

... or you can READ a page with some intelligence. 

One of the important skills I teach in my search classes is Reading through the fluff.  Or, in a catchier turn of phrase, reading with a Fluff Filter.  

That is, reading to get to the heart of the content while ignoring all of the persuasive text that’s added to get you to believe what they’re writing is true, wonderful, or desirable. 

Example:  While searching for a particular online lesson, I found this description of a company that's looking for a group to partner with them.  They wrote:
…they are on a mission to design a new revolutionary program, seeking out external partners to join them. Today we'll learn about the comprehensive process they took to find, evaluate and select a top tier creatively innovative third party Core Design Partner.

That’s fine, but let’s cut this down to the real core content by removing the fluff.  

Here's that paragraph with strike0uts for things that are merely descriptive or don't contribute anything: 
…they are on a mission to design a new revolutionary program, seeking out external partners to join them. Today we'll learn about the comprehensive process they took to find, evaluate and select a top tier creatively innovative third party Core Design Partner.

That is, as I read this my brain Fluff Filters this prose into the following: 

…they are seeking partners. Today we learn about how they will evaluate that partner.
 
It’s shorter and simpler to understand.  I don't really need to know about their mission (or that it's revolutionary... of course it is).  I don't really need to hear about their "comprehensive process" to find a "creatively innovative third party Core Design" partner.  


Here's my Fluff Filter:  

a. trim the descriptive text down to what you really need to know, 
b. take out anything that you know to be true already,
c. remove all of the puffy adjectives that pump up the description and make it sound great

  
Let’s try this with something you might come across--a description of a new online game. 

With a cute and chaotic cartoon art style and hordes of bizarre enemies, things can get seriously crazy. The depth of your choice in how to defend is unsurpassed with dozens of towers, each with their own upgrade trees to climb.

As I read this with my Fluff Filters on, I read: 

Things get crazy. You defend by building towers. 


See where I’m going with this?  Cut to the chase and read only the parts that carry the core information.  

Another example:  If you read the following (made-up!)  menu description with your Fluff Filter on, you’ll emerge with the key concept: 

The Grand Armadillo Soufflé is an angelic symphony of the most tender, center cut, marinated,  free-range armadillo steaks imaginable.  Sautéed with Sonoma Valley garlic and drenched in 17-year-old balsamic vinegar from Anderson Valley grapes grown on century old, organically raised vines. 

That key concept?  It's: 

Armadillo marinated in vinegar. 

As you read your search results (or menus, for that matter), keep your Fluff Filters on full.  See the content inside the content. 

Have any good examples of especially fluffy prose that you’ve seen in your searches?  Leave them in the comments below.


Search on.